Friday’s Guilty Pleasure for 12/20/2013

Tis the season for more Holiday Guilty Pleasures! I’m going back in time for this week’s guilty pleasure to something I’m pretty sure most of you have never seen…three black-and-white stop motion videos from the 1950’s that are a tradition on my hometown TV station. People love them so much that they’ve posted them on-line so that the folks who moved away and can’t make it home over the holidays can still see the videos and share them with their families.

There’s just something special about these little songs. They’re so simple. So quant. A reminder of a simpler time when Christmas wasn’t about the latest electronic device and a lot more about your family and friends. They’re part of the Christmas Magic I’ve been look for. I don’t know that watching them helps me find it, but it brings back all kinds of memories and today I’ll take it.

Without any further adieu, here are the three videos that I can’t help but watch each Christmas.

Here are three friends of the Big Man in the Red Suit that you probably don’t know. This is probably my favorite video. It also spawned outbursts of, “And Joooooeee,” whenever someone listed names, and what’s not to love about that.

Frosty is the MAN! Well, the snowman. He looks a little different here than what a lot of us are use to, but he’s still his thumpity-thump-thump self.

Don’t forget Suzy Snowflake who is dressed in a snow-white gown and tapping on the window panes of North Main Street! Born from the classic 1951 song written by Sid Tepper and Roy Brodsky, and most notably performed by Rosemary Clooney, Suzy characterizes everything that is fun about the first snowfall of the year!

I find Hardrock, Coco, and yes, Joe, absolutely adorable. And if you are anything like the me, you’ll catch yourself humming Suzy Snowflake’s little theme song for days! Enjoy!

Merry Christmas One and All!

If you have an idea for next week’s Guilty Pleasure – or if you would like to be the special Guest Blogger and write next week’s Guilty Pleasure post, drop me a line here! I would LOVE to hear your ideas. Especially all you Spoonies and Chronic Babes – what are the those little guilty pleasures that make the bad days a little better? Let’s share and help each other!

Advertisements

Looking for Christmas Magic

This has been a really rough year for us. Between loosing my job, and my health getting worse, and the car getting totaled, and now loosing my unemployment benefits and my freelance work suddenly getting put on hold, it feels like we’ve been kicked while we’re down over and over and over. It’s hard to find things to get excited about when all you can really think about is trying to find enough money for food and rent. I know things could be worse. I’m grateful we have a roof over heads (for now at least) and we are still managing to keep the kids fed, but it’s a constant struggle and hanging over our heads.

Christmas tree lit with white lights

Looking for Christmas Magic

We have our tree up and a few decorations. We’ve done our little bit of meager Christmas shopping. But with all of the stress and the worry and drama and the trauma of the last 10 months, it just doesn’t feel like Christmas to me.

My favorite part of the holidays is the magic. The feeling that anything is possible. The ideas of rebirth, renewal and goodwill. The belief that miracles really can and do happen. And maybe, just maybe, if we wish hard enough, a little of the magic in the twinkling lights and Santa’s sleigh and the stillness of Christmas Eve will rub off on us and at least for a few moments the world will be a better place.

I’m just not seeing it this year. The lights are just lights. The bells are making my tinnitus go overtime. The preparation is making me even more exhausted. And my daughters’ excitement for the big day is making me anxious. There’s no big hope for a better tomorrow, I’m just hoping to make it through today.

I want the magic. I want to feel like there’s something special in the air. I want to believe that miracles can happen, but after everything I’ve seen and been through over the years and looking at the choices I’m facing, I’m sorry to say I have my doubts right now. I guess I still believe miracles happen, I just don’t believe they’re meant for me. I really want to believe they could, I just don’t know how any more.

But Christmas is the time for miracles and rebirth. Maybe I can find the magic I’m looking for. Maybe we’ll get the miracle we need and things will start to turn around (I’m not expecting to hit the lottery – that ship already sailed, but maybe a job or better pay for my husband or a bonus that will actually cover our bills would be nice).

Heaven knows I’m trying to believe. I really need to believe because if I can’t find a way to believe in the magic of Christmas, I’m not sure what I’m going to find to believe in the rest of the year.

Ring Around the Blue Collar

gautier steel mill

gautier steel mill (Photo credit: macwagen)

I come from a long line of steel mill workers, assemblers, miners and other manners of true blue collars. Generation after generation working their way through the ranks at the unions. A few became “White Hats” (supervisors) along the way. These were men and women who worked hard their whole lives. Most of them didn’t finish high school — they dropped out help support their families. They were and are tough. I cannot be prouder to continue their legacy.

Labor Day has become about the end of summer. About parties, and pools and picnics. It used to be a little more about the men and women whose blood and sweat literary built the United States. The people who died in dangerous jobs to create a better world. To remember and honor those who fought for safer work environments and to establish the laws we take for granted today.

This Labor Day I want to thank the people out there doing the tough jobs I couldn’t do. Thank you to the people fighting for workplace safety and equality and making sure the laws are followed. Thank you to anyone whoever put in a hard days work on the production line, or down in the pit, and thought that what you did didn’t matter. . .

You see, it did matter. Because if it weren’t for my mom and dad, and my aunts and uncles, and my grandmothers grandfathers, and my great-grandmothers and great-grandfathers who worked those same lines I wouldn’t have been able to go to college. I wouldn’t have been able to learn video production or to tell stories the way I do.

Thank you to everyone who helped build the United States of America figuratively and literally.

United States of America

United States of America (Photo credit: Wikipedia)